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512 byte/sector

 
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David_Fischbach



Joined: 20 Nov 2007
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:33 pm    Post subject: 512 byte/sector Reply with quote

Hy friends,

I have the error message :

NEXTSTEP connot be installed on any disks.
You must have a 512 byte/sector disk with at list 120MB of free space.


I try to install NEXTSTEP 3.3 on a PC with IDE disk of 4.3 Gb.

How to have a IDE disk with 512 bytes per sector ?

Regards.
David
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oneNeXT



Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 134
Location: Europe

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does NS tell explicitely that your HD size is 4.3 Gb ?

I'm not sure that NS3.3 can handle IDE HD bigger than 2Gb.
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tjallen



Joined: 05 Sep 2009
Posts: 19
Location: Central New York

PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My office machine (my everyday machine) runs NS 3.3 on a 60 GB Maxtor disk. Of course, I can only use 8 GB of that disk, but it works fine in those 8 GB. The secret is to install to a smaller disk and then prepare the disk and copy over the software from the smaller disk. Here's what I do:

# fdisk /dev/rhd1h -useAllSectors
# disk -h "Host" -l "Disk" -u -i /dev/rhd1a
# mount /dev/hd1a /Disk
# gnutar -c --ignore-failed-read -l --exclude /private/vm/swapfile.front --exclude /Disk -f - / | ( cd /Disk; gnutar xsvpf - )

Of course, you need to have gnutar installed on the first disk in order to do this.
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David_Fischbach



Joined: 20 Nov 2007
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 12:42 pm    Post subject: NeXTSTEP 3.3 on NEXT with hard drive bigger than 10 GB Reply with quote

Hy tjallen,

I'm trying now to install a bigger SCSI 50 pins hard drive on a NeXTCube.

Could you detail each of your 4 lines :

# fdisk /dev/rhd1h -useAllSectors
# disk -h "Host" -l "Disk" -u -i /dev/rhd1a
# mount /dev/hd1a /Disk
# gnutar -c --ignore-failed-read -l --exclude /private/vm/swapfile.front --exclude /Disk -f - / | ( cd /Disk; gnutar xsvpf - )

Once your small hard drive is installed with NS, do you connect the 2 hard drive on the same ribbon cable ?
' fdisk ' means format the disk ?
' disk ' means make partitions ? but where are your 8 GB partition ?
"Host" means your hard drive Maxtor ?

Not so easy !

Please give me more details for each line please.

Thanks
David
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tjallen



Joined: 05 Sep 2009
Posts: 19
Location: Central New York

PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2013 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David,

You're running NeXT hardware, so I'm not sure that you'll have all the necessary software (you'll have to download the source to gnutar and compile and install) or even if you'll need to use fdisk, since it's meant for Intel machines. You'll also need to have a disktab for that specific SCSI disk appended to /etc/disktab. I've never made a disktab for a SCSI disk, though I have some 70 GB 2.5" SCSI drives that I'd like to use in my Pentium III NEXTSTEP machine, so some day I'll have to figure it out. There was at least one nice tutorial on making a disktab on one of the comp.sys.next.* newsgroups, but I don't know if one can still find them anymore. So, I'm not sure at all if my installation procedure for NEXTSTEP on a PC is going to help, but here goes anyway.

If you had an Intel machine, you would set the SCSI id of the new drive to 1 (the boot drive is usually 0 and I would guess that the MO drive would be 6 if you have one), making the new drive /dev/sd1a. You could attach the new drive on the SCSI cable pretty much anywhere as long as the disk furthest from the main board is terminated and the others are not. (Instead you could use a terminator on the last connector of the cable and make sure that no disk is terminated. SCSI is a little complicated but very robust once you've got the hardware configured properly. Search the web for the "SCSI FAQ.")

As root, you would execute the commands in order:
Code:

/usr/etc/fdisk /dev/rsd1h -useAllSectors

/usr/etc/disk -h "Host" -l "Disk" -u -i /dev/rsd1a

/usr/etc/mount /dev/sd1a /Disk

/usr/local/bin/gnutar -c --ignore-failed-read -l --exclude /private/vm/swapfile.front --exclude /Disk -f - / | ( cd /Disk; gnutar xsvpf - )



As I said, I don't think that there's an fdisk on the NeXT because it's not necessary, so you'd start with the disk command. (Enter "man disk" at a terminal prompt to see how the disk command works. You can do the same for any other command, too.)

For the /usr/etc/disk command, the "Host" is the name of your machine, and "Disk" is the name you want to give the disk. You can use any names here as they're just labeling the hard drive, but if you use another name in place of "Disk", for instance "SCSIdrive", then if you don't issue a mount command, I think that the OS will automount the first slice of the NEXTSTEP partition on the disk at its name, /SCSIdrive, though the mount command or a disktab can override that. If the first slice of the new disk is mounted at /SCSIdrive, then you would have to invoke the gnutar command as
Code:

/usr/local/bin/gnutar -c --ignore-failed-read -l --exclude /private/vm/swapfile.front --exclude /Disk -f - / | ( cd /SCSIdrive; gnutar xsvpf - )


If you get your software mirrored on the new SCSI drive, then you power off the machine, pull the old hard drive off the cable, change the SCSI id of the new drive to 0, and then power up. If you are not using a separate terminator, make sure that the last device on the cable is terminated and that no other devices are terminated. Now, when I put a new EIDE drive in my NEXTSTEP PC, I follow the steps I detailed in my previous post and then after the new drive is mirrored, I make sure that the new EIDE drive is set to Master rather than Slave, and I replace the original drive with the newly mirrored drive and reboot.

Now to what these commands are doing. On a PC with an EIDE drive, the /usr/etc/fdisk command creates an 8 GB primary MSDOS-style partition (because the EIDE driver can't see beyond the first 8 GB of an EIDE disk), and the /usr/etc/disk command will "slice up" the 8 GB partition into four 2 GB Unix "slices" within that partition, which NEXTSTEP will see as four different disks. /usr/etc/disk also "initializes' the disk by installing booters in the master boot record and in the MSDOS partition.

If the slices /dev/hd0b, /dev/hd0c, and /dev/hd0d are going to be permanently mounted within the filesystem (say you want /dev/hd0b to mounted at /Local, and /dev/hd0c to be mounted at /Users, etc.) then you'll need to edit the file /etc/fstab. Mine looks like this:

Code:

#
#       DO NOT DELETE THIS FILE, IT IS REQUIRED FOR BOOTING
#
#       This file contains information used to mount local hard disks.
#       Consult your Network and System Administration manual
#       for information on adding local disks.  Information on the format
#       of entries in this file can also be found in the fstab man page.
#
/dev/hd0a / 4.3 rw,noquota,noauto 0 1
/dev/hd0b /Local 4.3 rw,noquota  0 2
/dev/hd0c /Users 4.3 rw,noquota 0 3
/dev/hd0d /Backup 4.3 rw,noquota 0 4

The main tricky point if you're mirroring an EIDE drive onto a SCSI drive, or a SCSI drive onto an EIDE drive, is that you'll have to edit /Disk/etc/fstab to change the device names (/dev/hd0a or /dev/sd0a) BEFORE you power down and swap drives. If you don't, the system won't boot and you'll have to go back and set up the hardware as it was during mirroring and then edit the file. Doing things in the right order takes a LOT less time.

After mirroring my NEXTSTEP installation, I then usually go on and install other operating systems, such as Linux and Windows or FREEDOS. I use Linux to install the master boot record with all of the OSes in my lilo.conf file under Linux. If you only want NEXTSTEP on a PC, you'll probably eventually want to change the master boot record to boot only the NEXTSTEP partition and not give the annoying "Press n for NeXT or d for DOS" message at boot time. There is a NeXTanswer that tells how to do that with the /usr/etc/disk command but I don't have it handy and don't want to paste something incorrect here as an incorrect /usr/etc/disk command could make the disk unbootable and you'd have to start all over again.

I hope I've helped, but I fear that this will seem like a gargantuan task.

Ted
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