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Full install guide?

 
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Atariangamer



Joined: 14 Jun 2010
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 2:57 pm    Post subject: Full install guide? Reply with quote

I was here awhile back trying to make NEXTSTEP run on an old laptop I had, but I kinda gave up on it after I couldn't quite understand the driver issues I was running into, as well as being disappointed in application availability.

That was...a year and a half ago, I believe. Strange how my interests have changed since then.

I got another of the same type laptop (IBM ThinkPad 380ED) and want to try OPENSTEP on it. I've kinda resigned to the fact that I won't be doing much internet or anything spectacular with it, but between Windows, OPENSTEP, and OS/2...I'd like to try it.

Now, by the question in the title, I've yet to find a good, modern guide that doesn't immediately defect to "Just virtualize it". I know that my laptop is supported, and I'd like to run some stuff on it.

So, how do I go about installing this thing? I've got images of the Install and Developer CDs, as well as the images of all the floppy discs (boot, drivers, and beta drivers). I can burn the images and rawrite the floppies, but what then? How do I go about getting programs and stuff to it? (also, where's the best place to get some decent programs, like some office stuff and some games, maybe?)

Any help would be appreciated.
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Nitro
Site Admin


Joined: 22 Oct 2005
Posts: 421
Location: Littleton, Colorado USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are a couple of links to hopefully get you started. RacerX has a nice visual install guide on his site which you can find here:

http://www.shawcomputing.net/resources/next/software/install/ns_install.html

You can find a lot of software for NEXTSTEP and OPENSTEP in our NeXTfiles archive, which you can find here:

http://www.nextcomputers.org/NeXTfiles/
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ebann



Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Posts: 45

PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could also consider installing OpenSolaris. Pretty solid performer with many modern technology.
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White Box running OPENSTEP 4.2
Dual Pentium III 550MHz | 320MB ECC SDRAM
Matrox Millenium II 8MB
SanDisk 2GB Compact Flash (CF-to-IDE)
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Atariangamer



Joined: 14 Jun 2010
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, so I can see how to get the base 4.2, but what about the patches? as well as the other drivers and stuff (supposedly my laptop is fully supported, so I should be able to get sound, color, or all of that).

Also, I'm thinking of upgrading the hard drive. The internal one is 2.1GB, and the more I'm thinking on it, the more I'd like a little of everything. I've got an equally old 10GB drive I pulled from a PowerBook, and it looks like the heads and sectors are the same (which was an issue before), so it'd work as a drag and drop upgrade. But then how would one go about partitioning it? I know there's an issue past 4GB or something...

And looking at the OPENSTEP apps directory in the archive, there seems to be next to nothing currently useful for the OS...
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bkmoore



Joined: 01 Jan 2009
Posts: 183
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
so I can see how to get the base 4.2, but what about the patches?


The easiest way to setup a nextstep computer with the patches is to get networking going first, then download the drivers from another computer using a cross-over cable. The default install enables ftp, so you can ftp into your nextstep computer and push all the files. But since you have an older laptop, it begs to ask does your laptop have Ethernet? If it doesn't, then your best bet is to download all the drivers and patches and make a CD-ROM that OpenStep can mount.

Quote:
But then how would one go about partitioning it? I know there's an issue past 4GB or something...


I had a similar setup in 1995 to what you are proposing, only on a desktop. You probably should use OS/2 to partition the HDD and install OS/2 first. You can use the OS/2 boot manager with OpenStep. You can then install OpenStep on one of the partitions. I wouldn't recommend using more than 2 GB for the root partition, even though 4GB is supposedly supported. Some drivers seem to have problems with larger partitions. You can use separate partitions to mount for the /Users, /LocalApps, etc. if you need more space. There are plenty of posts here on how to do this. You need to modify the fstab file.

Quote:
And looking at the OPENSTEP apps directory in the archive, there seems to be next to nothing currently useful for the OS...


Try looking in the NextStep directory, OpenStep can run NextStep apps. Most apps were compiled for NextStep and never ported to OpenStep. For starters, try downloading all the Omni apps and the Lighthouse apps. That should give you a useful baseline setup.

Have fun doing the setup and let us know how it turns out.
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Nitro
Site Admin


Joined: 22 Oct 2005
Posts: 421
Location: Littleton, Colorado USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as disk partitioning goes, a live Linux CD works well to partition IDE drives for OPENSTEP. OPENSTEP's fdisk program can get confused when using large hard drives. There are two types of partitions that you can set up for OPENSTEP/Intel, one uses BSD style “slices” only and the second type uses fdisk style partitions which you can then add BSD slices to. With fdisk style partitions you can use the rest of the disk for dual-booting another operating system. The maximum fdisk style partition that the OPENSTEP EIDE driver will recognize is 8063 MB, which is ~8 GB. You can then slice that up into BSD partitions of up 4 GB in size. As bkmoore pointed out, 4 GB boot partitions get kind of flakey, so it’s best to limit the boot partition to 2 GB in size. 4 GB partitions work fine as data-only partitions. One other quirk to mention is that OPENSTEP/Intel boot drives must have 512 byte sectors, which many drives use.

You can use the Linux fdisk program from a bootable live CD to create a partition 8063 MB in size. Once you have a partition created you will need to set the partition system ID to “a7” which designates it as a NEXTSTEP partition. These are the commands to run from a Linux terminal window to set up the drive, assuming your target hard drive is device sda (back up your data first!).

sudo fdisk /dev/sda
Type “m” for help (without the quotes)
Delete any existing partitions
Type “n” to add a new partition
Choose primary partition and set the partition number to 1
Choose the default starting sector
Type +8063M for the partition size
Type “t” to change the partition’s system id
Type “a7” as the hex code
Type “w” to write the partition table to disk and exit

Once this is done the drive is ready to install OPENSTEP. I hope that helps to get you up and running. Smile
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