Installing NS 3.3 on i486 Compaq?

Started by PowerPC, October 25, 2006, 03:24:27 PM

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PowerPC

'am tryn' to install NS 3.3 on my Compaq ProLinea 4/50 (16 MB RAM 1024 IDE HD (Due strange circumstances only 512 MB are recogniced))

While installing i tried the EIDE & ATAPI Device Controller (v3.35) obtainable by Apple - Installation works but while restarting am error occurs that mentioned driver isn't vailable from CD and i would 've to insert the FloppyDisk.

To the opint - when inserting the Disk following error is printed:

biosread error 0x4@18, C:0 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@18, C:0 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@18, C:0 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@18, C:0 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
Bad superblock: error 1
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
Bad superblock: error 1
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
biosread error 0x4@342, C:9 H:1 S:O
Bad superblock: error 1

Anyone knows what that's supposed to mean or encountered similar problems?

RacerX

You have two problems... first is that it is highly unlikely that a 486 would have EIDE... it would most likely have just IDE. Second is that is it also highly unlikely that the bios on such a system would be able to work with drives larger than 512 MB.

There are two ways around this:[list=1]
  • use the IDE driver and a smaller hard drive, or
  • get a compatible SCSI card (which I think should let you get around the 512 MB limit of the bios.[/list:o]

PowerPC

Well the BIOS actually says it would - in reality it wouldn't. Running DOS was never a problem - i just formated the recocnized 512 MB. NS won't do that?

brams

Quote from: "PowerPC"Well the BIOS actually says it would - in reality it wouldn't. Running DOS was never a problem - i just formated the recocnized 512 MB. NS won't do that?

Assuming the logic board has a BIOS that you are able to flash, does it have the latest BIOS
NeXTcube Turbo Dimension, NeXTstation Turbo Color, MP2100, Q840av, Q650, WS G4 500, Pismo G4 550, SGI Octane R12K MXE, BeBox 133.

itomato

I would consider starting fresh.

1. Check the hard drive model number, and get the actual Cylinder/Head/Sector count.  Google the model number and see if you can find a datasheet from the manufacturer.  It's probably a Quantum.  If you don't find anything, open up the box and look for a label on the disk.  Write down the CHS numbers and put them into the BIOS manually.

2. Check out the floppy drive.  It probably needs to be cleaned - alcohol and a cotton swap should do the trick.  You might (will probably) have to take it out of the computer, and perhaps remove the top cover.

---
How much RAM is in that machine?  It looks like it shipped with 4MB!!
Can you scrounge up a newer PC?  The Dell Optiplex GX series are NeXT/Openstep-ready; Pentium II Matrox video, 4GB hard drive, Intel PIIX ATA, PC100 memory, built-in Intel ethernet..  [/b]
-itomato

PowerPC

Quote from: "itomato"Write down the CHS numbers and put them into the BIOS manually.

You can do that?

RAM is 16 MB and the only newer x86 Computer i got is probably to new (Tyan Board, Dual PIII@700 MHz, elsa gloria graphics card, 512 MB RAM & 2x60 gig HD &c.)

itomato

Back in the olden days, that's how you had to do it.  IDE auto-detection is a relatively recent blessing.

You might actually have better luck with the Tyan.  Especially if it has an Intel BX chipset - this means it likely has the NS/OS compatible EIDE controller.

The video card should do VESA if it's a Permedia chipset, but I don't think the VESA drivers are available for NeXTSTEP.

It's worth a shot.  Of course, the OS won't make use of the second processor, but the PIII's of that vintage are the top of the line of fully supported (hardware wise) NS/OS machines.
-itomato

PowerPC

But hey - that's my Vista RC testing machine (don't lough too hard - it performes astonishing well on that computer)  8)