Legal issues of getting copies of Nextstep

Started by alobos, December 21, 2006, 11:52:40 AM

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alobos

Hi.

I would like to know if I paid for OS X 10.4, I'm entitled to use if I need to, versions 10.3 or 10.2, assuming that I'm not using them at the same time. Does this apply too for previous versions of the same OS?

In the MS world, I may have Windows XP, and that license lets me use Windows NT 3.1 too. So, Am I entitled to run Openstep 4.2 in my MacBook Pro through Parallels without "pirating"?

What about Abandonware? What's cool to pass around and what's not?  The intentions of use of the software, does it count? (non-commercial use, pure research and investigation, for the sake of just running it)

I would like to setup a site compiling everything I've found in terms of software and I don't care about the real legal stuff, but is it good or bad karma?

- Alex Lobos

nextchef

Quote from: "alobos"In the MS world, I may have Windows XP, and that license lets me use Windows NT 3.1 too.

In my experience, this is definitely not the case.  The license that comes with Windows gives you a license to run that version only, not any previous versions in place of it.  Depending on the version of the software, OEM or Retail, it may also be restricted to that particular machine, and not able to be transferred (OEM).  

A friend of mine works for a company that got in some trouble with the BSA for buying a bunch of new machines (with oem WinXP), and wiping them and loading Win2k instead.  The BSA asserted that the XP license did not give them the right to run Win2k, and that since the license on the old machines was an OEM version (and thus non-transferable), every install was technically an illegal install of Win2k.  Luckily all their other apps and software were properly licensed, so they were able to come to an agreement about the Win2k use.  If they had found any other issues with licensing, it would have gotten really bad for the company really fast.

Morale of the story is, you will probably not get into trouble for doing this (and in the case of Win 3.1 why would you want to) but apparently it is technically not allowed.

Chef

alobos

So that means I'm on the Dark Side..

It should be great if like System 6 and 7.5 apple would let us get legally Nextstep or Openstep..  What about defunct software companies? Why couldn't we share their apps freely if there's nobody around to be offended? Is there actually someone still supporting software for Nextstep/Openstep?

Cheers,

- Alejandro Lobos Kunstmann

nextchef

Quote from: "alobos"So that means I'm on the Dark Side..

It should be great if like System 6 and 7.5 apple would let us get legally Nextstep or Openstep..  What about defunct software companies? Why couldn't we share their apps freely if there's nobody around to be offended? Is there actually someone still supporting software for Nextstep/Openstep?

Cheers,

- Alejandro Lobos Kunstmann

I can not speak with any certainty for how Apple or NeXT handles this, except to relay what others have stated that Apple did provide copies of NS3.3 to anyone with black hardware at one time.  Apparently blackholeinc can legally provide NS/OS software, with the blessing of Apple, for a nominal fee.

Chef

blackcube

Quote from: "nextchef"In my experience, this is definitely not the case.  The license that comes with Windows gives you a license to run that version only, not any previous versions in place of it.  Depending on the version of the software, OEM or Retail, it may also be restricted to that particular machine, and not able to be transferred (OEM).  Chef

You have downgrade rights with Microsoft only if you have licensed your software through a valid Volume or Enterprise licensing agreement.  And those downgrade rights only cover one version back.  XP to Win2k for instance, not back to XP, 98 or Win3.1.

I was actually told by two different  Microsoft sales reps that the OEM license isn't valid for an enterprise wth more than 10 desktops.  At the ten desktop level, you are required to purchase XP OEM from the system builder and then relicense it from Microsoft with a Volume or Enterprise licensing agreement.  In effect, all business with 10 or more desktops are required to pay M$ twice for the same software.
www.blackcube.org - The Texas State Home for Orphaned and Wayward Computers

nextchef

Quote from: "blackcube"
You have downgrade rights with Microsoft only if you have licensed your software through a valid Volume or Enterprise licensing agreement.  And those downgrade rights only cover one version back.  XP to Win2k for instance, not back to XP, 98 or Win3.1.

That is good information to know, as I do not thing MS could make the licensing any more complicated if they tried.

Chef

jheis

Friends don't let friends do Micro$oft.

James
NeXT Turbo Cube (acquired at factory auction), 128 MB ram, 2 Gig HP drive, running OPENSTEP 4.2.
2 Color Turbo NeXTstations.
Early mono NeXTstation.

patrick_symes

Quote from: "nextchef"

I can not speak with any certainty for how Apple or NeXT handles this, except to relay what others have stated that Apple did provide copies of NS3.3 to anyone with black hardware at one time.  Apparently blackholeinc can legally provide NS/OS software, with the blessing of Apple, for a nominal fee.

Chef

OK this may sound silly but would Apple today provide a copy of NeXTStep or OpenStep to use with my black hardware, becasue I did buy it used and did not include a copy? If this is still true who would I have to contact to get a copy?