Canon object.station revival

Started by Scutboy, September 22, 2023, 05:24:06 AM

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Scutboy

Recently came into a longtime want - a Canon object.station 41, with the keyboard.

The SCSI card and drives are in the machine, thought the SCSI cable is missing.

On power-up, the caps/num/scroll lights flash briefly, and there is power to the disk drives, but there is no POST, no beeps, no activity on the screen. Pressing numlock etc. don't change any of the lights.

I will need to pull the machine apart; I'm assuming troubleshooting would be what one would do on a "regular" 486 of this vintage.

Anyone have any previous experience and knowledge to share? I see a _lot_ of what look like gumdrop caps on the board, so I think I have an idea of where this is going...

Thanks in advance for any words of wisdom!

gtnicol

I had one of those once and as you said, for the most part it was just a regular (and not particularly high quality) PC.

itomato

It's irregular to say the least. Things are tightly packed and there are cables bus connectors that might need reseating.
I'd strip it down until it POSTS, then start adding things back.

Motherboard probably needs a cap or two.

Take many photos.
-itomato

pTeK

I read that it was a 486/DX-100  8)  with RAM support to 96MB and a special graphics card for NextStep. I hope you have the drivers and am looking forward to read about the speed difference of a DX-100 over 66Mhz or if it's the 96MB Ram that makes it a lot more speedy.

crispin

The Canon ObjectStation contains a daughter board where you plug in the cards. If that board has problems the computer will not POST. 

Scutboy

Did a quick check of power - getting good 12v and 5v at the molex connectors for the hard drives, at least.

I pulled the riser card after removing the SCSI card and reseated everything, but that didn't make any difference. However, I noticed that the soldered on battery on the main board had (surprise) started to leak. It's in a tight corner so I'll have to take the time to really tear the machine down at get to that, at least.

Will give me an opportunity to examine the logic board closely as well.